iSchool Course Offerings

Course Type Filter

Number Title Description Last Scheduled
I 178IIndependent Study2021
I 178RResearch Experience2021
I 278IIndependent Study2021
I 278RResearch Experience2021
I 301Introduction to InformaticsIntroduction to the field of informatics, including cultural heritage informatics, health informatics, human-centered data science, social informatics, social justice informatics, and user experience design.2021
I 302Academic Success in the Digital UniversityExamine a wide variety of information and academic resources, tools, and skills; with a focus on the digital landscape of higher education. Explore the features of the primary learning management system; communication and organization tools; library resources; basic online research resources; and ethical and safety concerns.
2021
I 303Ethical Foundations for InformaticsExpected to launch in Spring 2022.
Survey the ethical foundations for informatics, incorporating non-Western and feminist perspectives. Apply these ethical foundations to contemporary problems in informatics. Examine the confrontation of ethical dilemmas in the workplace, including recognizing value trade-offs, affected stakeholders, and potential solutions.

🏴 This course carries the Ethics flag
Not Yet Scheduled
I 304Programming for InformaticsExamine the fundamentals of computer programming and practice developing and documenting code.

2021
I 310Topics in Introductory Informatics (see individual class topics below)
 Fake News and Facts in the Misinformation AgeThis course will explore information from multiple angles, with an emphasis on exploring the role of deception in a variety of areas--politics, international relations, business, advertising, interpersonal relations, and more. Increasing info skills and critical thinking related to education and the world at large will be featured.2021
 User Experience and Design ThinkingPerceptual psychology, cognitive psychology, and other scientific underpinnings of user experience; Methods used in the pursuit of UCD; and careers in UX.2020
 User ResearchHands-on experience with investigating and analyzing how people use designed objects.2021
 Young Adult LiteratureExamination of a variety of young adult texts written for people ages sixteen to twenty-five years old. In particular, students will examine how young adult literature (YAL) texts confront serious social, political, and cultural issues in a way that makes complex issues accessible for an adolescent reader outside the norms of the larger culture. In addition to tracking issues through various genres, students will become familiar with significant YAL authors, formats, censorship, and film adaptations.2021
I 310CIntroduction to Cultural Heritage InformaticsExamine the fundamentals of managing, describing, organizing, preserving, and providing access to data and information in a wide range of technological forms.

This course is expected to launch in Spring 2022.
Not Yet Scheduled
I 310DIntroduction to Human-Centered Data ScienceExamine the fundamentals of collecting, managing, and analyzing data; with consideration for the ethical responsibility of data science and the importance of critical thinking.
2021
I 310JIntroduction to Social Justice InformaticsExplore the leveraging of data, information, and technology for the greater benefit of society and to help ensure a level playing field for everyone in the information age.

Coming Soon. Official launch date to be determined.
Not Yet Scheduled
I 310MIntroduction to Health InformaticsExplore designing and implementing information technologies to improve healthcare delivery, healthcare management, and health outcomes.

Coming Soon. Official launch date to be determined.
Not Yet Scheduled
I 310SIntroduction to Social InformaticsExplore the leveraging of data, information, and technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organizations while also providing a more ethical and humane environment for workers.

Coming Soon. Official launch date to be determined.
Not Yet Scheduled
I 310UIntroduction to User Experience DesignIntroduction to user experience, human-computer interaction, and the human-centered design of interfaces and applications for mobile devices and the web.

Coming Soon. Official launch date to be determined.
2021
I 320Topics in Informatics (see individual class topics below)
 Blockchain and the Decentralized EconomyBuilt on the back of a blockchain computing stack, this course will focus on topics and research key to the transition to a decentralized economy. We will cover the dynamics of emerging technologies, highlight new ideas from leading entrepreneurs and researchers shaping this future, and provide students with an opportunity to build their research into a product or startup. Students will use lean methodologies and anchor their approach in content covered through the course. 2020
 Blockchain, Web 3, and the Internet ComputerBuilt on the back of a blockchain computing stack, this course will focus on topics and research key to the transition to Web 3 and a decentralized economy. We will cover the dynamics of blockchain technology, highlight new ideas from leading entrepreneurs and researchers shaping this future, and provide students with an opportunity to build their research into a product or startup. Students will use lean methodologies and anchor their approach in content covered through the course. 2021
 Design and Research FundamentalsDesign and research fundamentals covers what it means to apply research and design to problems faced by consumers, businesses, and groups of people. The techniques covered in this course will help students gain confidence in visual communication, understand the different practices related to learning about users, and the elements of design.2020
 Evaluation of Interactive SystemsProject-based introduction to the principles and strategies for evaluating interactive systems through usability testing. Planning, preparing, and conducting a usability test; as well as analysis and presentation of its results. 2021
I 320.01Information in CyberspaceExplore the history and social impact of internet, web, and other network technologies. Examine the methods and tools for media creation with an emphasis on technological self-sufficiency.
2021
I 320.02Children's LiteratureExplore the evaluation, selection, and proper and creative use of books and other media with children.
2021
I 320.03Comics, Graphic Novels, and MangaExamine the historical development and a contemporary survey of prominent visual narrative formats and genres such as graphic and visual novels, comics, and manga.

🏴 This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. The purpose of the Cultural Diversity in the United States Flag is for students to explore in depth the shared practices and beliefs of one or more underrepresented cultural groups subject to persistent marginalization. In addition to learning about these diverse groups in relation to their specific contexts, students should engage in an active process of critical reflection. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one underrepresented cultural group in the U.S.
2021
I 320CTopics in Cultural Heritage InformaticsAdvanced topics for the Cultural Heritage Informatics track are expected to launch in Fall 2022.Not Yet Scheduled
I 320D Topics in Human-Centered Data Science (see individual class topics below)
 Human-Centered Social Network AnalysisProvides students with an understanding of the fundamental concepts, common methods, and analytical tools of social network analysis. Students will gain experience applying both exploratory and qualitative methods to real-world problems within the social network domain.

Note: Success in this class will require prior experience programming in Python.
2021
I 320JTopics in Social Justice InformaticsComing Soon. Official launch date to be determined.Not Yet Scheduled
I 320MTopics in Health InformaticsComing Soon. Official launch date to be determined.Not Yet Scheduled
I 320STopics in Social InformaticsComing Soon. Official launch date to be determined.Not Yet Scheduled
I 320UTopics in User Experience Design (see individual class topics below)
 User ResearchHands-on experience with investigating and analyzing how people use designed objects.2021
I 372Career Success in the Digital OrganizationExamine the essential skills for obtaining a job and sustaining a successful career with an emphasis on integrity, teamwork, time management, responsiveness to feedback, and written and oral communication. Explore tools for computer-supported cooperative work that facilitate online collaboration.
Not Yet Scheduled
I 378IIndependent Study2021
I 378RResearch Experience2021
I 379CCapstoneNot Yet Scheduled
I 679HHonors ThesisResearch, read, and develop an honors thesis subject and proposal for one semester; followed in the second semester by the writing and defense of a final honors thesis.

Two-semester course taken as I 679HA (semester 1) and I 679HB (semester 2). Credit will be awarded upon completion of both semesters.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 181Individual Studies (1 credit hour)In-depth study of a problem or topic related to information studies, usually culminating in an examination or a scholarly written report.

Individual Instruction.
With the consent of the graduate advisor, may be repeated for credit.

INF 181 is worth 1 hour of semester credit. Students wanting 2 or 3 hours of credit should take INF 281 or INF 381 respectively.

Individual Study proposal form: pdf | word
2021
INF 181EElectronic PortfolioCreation of a website that displays the student's professional aims, interests, and pursuits, including resume and work samples. Designed to be taken during the final semester of the Master of Science in Information Studies degree program.

Individual instruction.
2021
INF 188TInternship in Libraries and Other Information AgenciesMinimum 40 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester.

For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

May not be counted toward any degree in the School of Information.

Required Form: https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/images/iSchool_x88T_Application_Form.pdf
2021
INF 281Individual Studies (2 credit hours)In-depth study of a problem or topic related to information studies, usually culminating in an examination or a scholarly written report.

Individual Instruction.
With consent of the graduate advisor, may be repeated for credit.

INF 281 is worth 2 hours of semester credit. Students wanting 1 or 3 hours of credit should take INF 181 or INF 381 respectively.

Individual Study proposal form: pdf | word
2021
INF 288TInternship in Libraries and Other Information AgenciesMinimum 80 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester.

For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

May not be counted toward any degree in the School of Information.

Required Form: https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/images/iSchool_x88T_Application_Form.pdf
2021
INF 380CInformation in Social and Cultural ContextExamines the role of information in human activities, particularly in relation to particular social and cultural contexts. Examines how individuals, groups, organizations, institutions, and society at large create, find, use, understand, share, transform, and curate information.2019
INF 380D Designing Dynamic Web PagesPrinciples and practices for designing, developing, and evaluating interactive desktop and mobile Web pages. Theories and models for color, styles, and interactive page elements, such as forms. Students create and evaluate Web pages using current technologies, such as XHTML/HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, AJAX, and Adobe Flash.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 380EPerspectives on InformationMultidisciplinary and historical examination of concepts of information. Contrasts key literature from information studies with perspectives from other fields.

NOTE: MSIS students must earn a grade of B or better in the MSIS core courses (below) in order for the courses to apply to the master's degree. A grade of B- does NOT satisfy this requirement.
2021
INF 380PIntroduction to ProgrammingIntroduction to common concepts and constructs of modern computer programming such as classes and objects, methods, inheritance, data types, variables, operators, procedures, and code libraries. Development of programmatic solutions to specific computing problems and design applications for modern computing platforms such as desktop, tablet, mobile, and the World Wide Web. Intended for students with no significant prior programming experience.
2021
INF 381Individual Studies (3 credit hours)In-depth study of a problem or topic related to information studies, usually culminating in an examination or a scholarly written report.

Individual Instruction.
With consent of the graduate advisor, may be repeated for credit.

INF 381 is worth 3 hours of semester credit. Students wanting 2 or 3 hours of credit should take INF 281 or INF 381 respectively.

Individual Study proposal form: pdf | word
2021
INF 381WAdvanced Problems in Information Studies

Study of a problem or topic related to information studies. Offered as an online course through the WISE Consortium. [Note: The iSchool will no longer participate in the WISE Consortium program after Spring 2020.]

With consent of the graduate adviser, may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.
2020
INF 382CUnderstanding and Serving UsersOverview of human-computer interaction, understanding client groups, information filters, information literacy and information-seeking behavior, as well as user studies and usability testing.2021
INF 382DIntroduction to Information Resources and ServicesMajor reference resources and strategies useful in providing information services in libraries and other information agencies.2021
INF 382HLegal Information ResourcesIdentification of relevant legal information resources, efficient retrieval of legal information, and the role of technology in legal information access.2021
INF 382LInformation Resources and Services (see individual class topics below)
 Inquiry and Information Seeking in K-12Examination of inquiry models and information seeking theories relevant to K-12 teaching and learning. An emphasis on strategies for teaching specific information literacy skills within the context of an inquiry process and subject areas and on the tools and resources available to support student learning.2021
INF 382PCompetitive Intelligence Resources and StrategiesResources and strategies for market and competitive analysis. Research and analysis of market trends and financial, technical, and cultural strengths and weaknesses of companies. Online, print, and primary research and analytical techniques. Ethics, process, and presentation are emphasized.2019
INF 382SLibrary Instruction and Information LiteracyHistory of instruction in information service settings; learning theory, including learning styles; professional organizations involved in supporting instruction; instructional delivery modes and materials; and evaluation.
2021
INF 383HIntroduction to Digital HumanitiesA hands-on introduction to guiding infrastructural and institutional developments involved in digital scholarship. Areas of focus include archives, collection, and scholarly editions; data curation; funding; text encoding; tool building; scholarly publishing; and visualization.
2020
INF 383SLibrary Information Science, Espionage, and Intelligence Gathering Examines the historical and conceptual linkages between the field of library information science and the practices of intelligence gathering and espionage. Explores the role and structure of the intelligence community, the similarities and contrasts between intelligence practitioners and other information professionals, and historical case studies that illuminate areas of overlap and cooperation between the disciplines.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 384COrganizing InformationIntroduction to the concepts of information organization, representation, and classification. Consideration of different traditions of practice and user concerns.
2021
INF 384DCollection ManagementPhilosophical and social context, objectives, and methodology of evaluating, selecting, and managing library materials.
2021
INF 384FSeminar in Information OrganizationCritical, in-depth examination of significant concepts in information organization.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 384HConcepts of Information RetrievalThe science and engineering of building automated search engines: foundations and emerging methods, key models and approaches, front-end usability and back-end algorithms, theories of relevance, annotation practices, and system evaluation/benchmarking.
2018
INF 384MTopics In Description and Metadata (see individual class topics below)
 Theories and Applications of MetadataPrinciples and practices for describing information resources.
2019
INF 385CHuman-Computer InteractionThe history and importance of human-computer interaction (HCI), theories of HCI design, modeling of computer users and interfaces, empirical techniques for analyzing systems and interfaces, interface design, and styles of interaction. Emphasis on reviewing research papers, current works, and future directions in HCI research.
2021
INF 385EInformation Architecture and DesignThe theory and design of information architecture: models that provide structure and context for information to shape meaning, purpose, and utility toward understanding. Students present theoretical reviews; map and design; and develop novel information architectures using a variety of methods and software applications.
2021
INF 385GAdvanced UsabilityDesigned to build upon the skills covered in Information Studies 385P. Individual project evaluating a Web site or other software user interface. Students devise a plan for testing, secure IRB approval to test human subjects, conduct study, analyze date, write a report, and present the results and conclusions.
2021
INF 385HDigital Media Design Design and production of graphic, audio, video, and multimedia materials, with emphasis on aesthetics and usability.
2018
INF 385KProjects in Human-Computer InteractionProjects based on theories of human-computer interaction design, modeling of computer users and interfaces, empirical techniques for analyzing systems and interfaces, interface design, and styles of interaction.
2021
INF 385MDatabase Management Principles and practices of database management and database design. Discussion and implementation of a database. Application life cycle, data dictionaries, relational database design, SQL queries, reports and other interfaces to database data, and documentation. Students work on individual and group projects.
2021
INF 385NInformaticsInvestigation of informatics movements around the world and in various disciplines and professions, such as biomedicine, nursing, public health, education, business, law, and public affairs.

Repeatable with Different Topics

2018
INF 385PUsabilityThe basics of user-centered design through the lifecycle of a software product. Includes perceptual, psychological, and other scientific underpinnings of usability and the justification for the application of usability engineering in software development.
2021
INF 385RSurvey of DigitizationIntroduction to the issues and trends in digital asset management and digitization initiatives, including planning and project management, asset delivery and management systems, interoperability and the importance of standards, copyright, metadata basics, digital preservation, and specific digitization processes for documents, images, video, and sound.
2020
INF 385SDigital LibrariesResearch, development, and evaluation issues related to digital collections of documents, data, and multimedia formats, including metadata and interoperability; access strategies and user interfaces; implications for policies and social issues; collection development with physical as well as digital materials
2021
INF 385TSpecial Topics in Information Science (see individual class topics below)
 Access and Care of Indigenous Cultural KnowledgeRepeatable with Different Topics
2018
 Access and Reference in Libraries and Archives- topic description unavailable -2018
 Accessible User ExperienceIntroduction to the field of Accessibility with a focus on digital content creation and evaluation. Practical application of the methods and tools used to develop product experiences that are inclusive of those with a wide range of disabilities. 2021
 Applied EncryptionThis course aims to give students a thorough understanding of how encryption works by examining and implementing the most foundational and widely used forms of encryption. This knowledge will arm students with the technical security literacy that is vital to understanding and combating threats to confidentiality and privacy.2020
 Applied Encryption IIn-depth and hands-on look at cyber-security and the technologies that keep our private information private. NO previous programming or security experience is required or presumed, and students from all topical areas in the iSchool are welcome. In this class, students will learn Python scripting, and use it to implement lightweight versions of both ancient and modern cryptography. Topics covered in Applied Encryption 1 range from the cryptographic strategies of Roman soldiers, to the consequences of putting backdoors in our smartphones.2019
 Applied Encryption IIThis course aims to give students a thorough understanding of how encryption works by examining and implementing the most foundational and widely used forms of encryption. This knowledge will arm students with the technical security literacy that is vital to understanding and combating threats to confidentiality and privacy.2019
 Artificial Intelligence in HealthExploration of the major components of health IT systems, ranging from data semantics (ICD10), data interoperability (FHIR), diagnosis code (SNOMED CT), to workflow in clinical decision support systems. Deeper investigation into how AI innovations (e.g., machine learning, deep learning, computer vision) are transforming our healthcare system by introducing new concepts of mobile health, AI diagnosis, AI medicine, smart device, and intelligent delivery. 2021
 Blockchain Uses and ApplicationsThis class will explore the various uses and applications of distributed ledger2019
 Blockchain and the Decentralized EconomyBuilt on the back of a blockchain computing stack, this course will focus on topics and research key to the transition to a decentralized economy. We will cover the dynamics of emerging technologies, highlight new ideas from leading entrepreneurs and researchers shaping this future, and provide students with an opportunity to build their research into a product or startup. Students will use lean methodologies and anchor their approach in content covered through the course. 2020
 Concepts and Practices in 3D Printing3d printing is one of the fastest growing technologies commercially available today. This
course will highlight the ways in which 3d printing applies to the field of information science in
both theory and practice.
2020
 Concepts and Practices in Information SecurityRepeatable with Different Topics
2019
 Critical Data StudiesThis course introduces students to the critical study of data through the landscape of networked
information and communication technologies (ICTs)—their history, present, and future. It will
examine the social impact and technical developments of data technologies, defined as any
system designed to gather, process, or distribute information and data through network
architecture.
2021
 Critical Perspectives On Cultural Data Analysis[topic description unavailable]2018
 Crowdsourcing For Computer VisionThis class will cover fundamental and state-of-art problems in computer vision, the subdiscipline of artificial intelligence that tries to create computers that can “see”. Students
will explore this field through examination of the human-based challenges faced when teaching computers to see.
2020
 Cybersecurity Law and PolicyA deep dive into a broad range of legal and policy issues associated with cybersecurity, intended as a comprehensive introduction to the topic and the many public and private institutions involved in it.2021
 Data Management and the Research LifecycleThis class equips thoughtful thinkers with powerful data science skills. You will learn how to manage and
work with complex and big datasets in social science research, particularly in policy and nonprofit studies.
You are expected to learn the following skills and respond to "big questions" that have social importance:
1) Understand the structure of data and how to work with big and complex datasets; 2) Understand the
workflows of acquiring and managing data; 3) Able to conduct data-intensive and replicable social science
research.
2021
 Data SemanticsThis course aims to provide the basic overview of the Semantic Web in general, and data semantics in particular, and how they can be applied to enhance data integration and knowledge inference. Ontology is the backbone of the Semantic Web. It models the semantics of data and represents them in markup languages proposed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). W3C plays a significant role in directing major efforts at specifying, developing, and deploying standards for sharing information. Semantically enriched data paves the crucial way to facilitate the Web functionality and interoperability.

This course aims to provide the basic overview of what the Semantic Web is and how it can be applied. It contains three parts: Semantic Web language, RDF graph database (i.e., RDF triple store), and its applications. The fundamental part of the course is the Semantic Web languages. It starts from XML and goes further to RDF and OWL. The RDF graph database part introduces different APIs of Jena and its reasoners. The application part showcases current trends on semantic applications.
2021
 Data StorytellingAn introduction to data analysis and visualization with a focus on human elements, like understanding and operationalizing stakeholder needs. Software covered includes Tableau and Excel. No previous coding experience necessary.2021
 Designing User Interfaces for ChildrenOverview of concepts related to child development and user interface design for children, with an emphasis on early and middle childhood. Through this course, students will learn about technology's potential impact on cognitive and social development and how child development relates to
media design. Students will interact and evaluate digital media technologies on children's learning, including social learning. Topics include, but are not limited to, brain development, social cognition, symbolic processing, media usage, and self-representation.
2021
 Digital Asset ManagementThis class provides an overview of digital asset management in relation to information
professions in business, technology, archives and media libraries. Students will
explore the core aspects of digital asset management: system planning, schema and
taxonomy, technology project management, policy development and documentation,
copyright, brand, metrics, funding, and user experience management, as well as the
tools, terminology, uses, and applications in support of business, higher education,
non-profits, and government.
2020
 Digital Forensics and Incident ResponseIntroduction to digital forensic technology, computer network security, and organizational planning and response to cyberattacks. 2021
 Disaster Planning and ResponseIntroduction to the fundamental preservation concepts, planning strategies, and applied response techniques for the preservation of cultural heritage collections in the wake of floods, fires, and other disaster events. 2021
 Electronic Discovery and Digital EvidenceEvidence is information, and nearly all information is created, collected, communicated and stored electronically. Thus, the ability to identify, discover, interpret, authenticate and challenge electronically stored information is a crucial litigation skill. This course will seek to reconcile the federal rules and e-discovery case law with the sources, forms and methods of information technology and computer forensics. Students will explore information technology, learn to "speak geek" and acquire hands-on, practical training in finding electronic evidence, meeting preservation duties, guarding against spoliation, selecting forms of production, communicating and cooperating with opposing counsel and managing the vast volume and variety of digital evidence and metadata. With an emphasis on understanding the nuts and bolts of information technology, the course teaches practical considerations, tips and tools as well as pivotal case law that has shaped this area of the law and the electronic discovery industry as a whole. 2021
 Ethics of AI: Theorizing Good SystemsArtificial intelligence is becoming an increasingly important fixture in our everyday lives. This course will help you to understand the ethical challenges related to AI and how to address them. To do this, the course will provide you with a broad range of ethical theories, including non-Western and feminist theories, and teach you to apply these theories to contemporary ethical challenges resulting from AI.2019
 Exhibits In Cultural InstitutionsExhibits are a fundamental element of libraries, archives and museums. This class will take students through all phases of the exhibit process including selecting, assessing and transporting materials; designing, preparing, installing and taking down the exhibit; and preparing facilities and condition reports. 2019
 Fundamentals of Human-Machine InteractionInvestigate the Human-Machine relationship as a single process and dive in to the human
aspects of this relationship. The thought being if you understand the human
and what his/her needs are in the relationship, then you will be better
equipped to influence the machine part of the relationship in a way that will
lead to a successful, communicative partnership.
2019
 Human-AI InteractionIntroduction to combining human and machine intelligence to benefit people and society. Exploration of cutting-edge research on a number of topics related to human-AI interaction, including the psychological and societal impacts of AI, AI biases and fairness, transparency and explainability, mixed-initiative interaction, human-in-the-loop decision-making, embodied and natural language based AI, and design guidelines and methods for AI user experiences.2021
 Implementing Library IT SystemsThe primary goal of this class is to learn principles and practices of database management and database design. Over the course of the semester we will discuss the database relational database design, normalization, SQL queries, reports and other interfaces to database data, and documentation. Lectures will also cover writing ethical and privacy issues associated with database systems. In- class instruction and exercises will focus on the fundamentals for creating sophisticated, interactive, and secure database applications.2020
 Interacting with Information in Advanced Visualization EnvironmentsTheoretical knowledge of the research areas of Data and Information Visualization. Practical skills for designing, building, and evaluating interactive visualization
applications for Visualization Environments that use multiple systems, including: augmented reality, virtual reality, large display walls, motion tracking, etc.
2019
 Interaction DesignThis team oriented project course will explore several issues surrounding the design and production of usable and elegant interactive experiences. Students will be introduced to topics including the iterative design process, physical and digital prototyping, and user testing. 2020
 Introduction to BlockchainOverview of the concept, technology, and impacts of blockchain. Multi-level, multidisciplinary, and critical analysis of how blockchains work, where they are used, their limitations, and how they affect organizations and society now and in the future. 2021
 Introduction to Machine LearningThis class will cover core and cutting edge concepts employed in machine learning to solve
artificial intelligence problems. Students will learn the theory behind a range of machine
learning tools and practice applying the tools to, for example, textual data (natural language processing), visual data (computer vision), and the combination of both textual and
visual data.
2021
 Linked Open Data and Computational Social Science Methods- topic description unavailable -2019
 Mapping For The Common GoodMapping for the Common Good provides students of any background and any academic
specialty/interest a broad theoretical and technical understanding of maps, spatial data and geovisualization. It is intentionally structured to highlight the many ways in which geographic information technologies and spatial reasoning skills can profoundly impact our understanding of the world. It also provides students with an opportunity to better appreciate how spatial data and
mapping can be used to develop strategies, plans, and designs to improve the quality of life forcommunities and their citizens.
2020
 Media, Memory, and the ArchiveIntroduction to one of the most complicated (and under-studied) components of the media industries: Preservation. Beginning with a contextualization of the field, and of its precedents in European collecting practice, public records offices, and museums, the course will employ both a theoretical and practical approach to archival media product. Debates over the merits (and drawbacks) of defining media product as "artifact" will be complemented by larger discussions over the practical ramifications of copyright and physical deterioration - increasingly problematic areas for both the filmmaker and academic researcher. Subjects will include: preservation principles, the impact of access programs and strategies, and the role of the archivist or curator. Utilizing the literature available as well as film and video resources of the University of Texas and the Austin community at large, students will combine an analytical approach to the history and theory of collecting with "hands-on" research - from Hollywood features and educational films, to home movies and the ever vanishing footage of the public domain. 2021
 Ontology DesignThe first part of this course covers essential knowledge needed to create sound and interoperable metadata schemas and their application profiles (APS), which provide the bases for metadata interoperability. Designing metadata schemas and their APs will be done using XML Editors. Its focus will be on how to achieve syntactic interoperability among diverse metadata. The second part of the course will be focused on providing students with in-depth knowledge of how to design and implement sound ontologies for semantic systems. Particular attention will be given to smart use of ontology languages such as RDF/OWL (W3C standard) and topic maps (ISO standard). In a summary, this course will be focused on designing and implementing interoperable metadata and ontology schemas using XML and Ontology Editors. However, it will not deal with developing interfaces of those systems, so programming skills are not required for this class. 2021
 Participatory Design and Research for Special PopulationsThis seminar will examine methods used in empirical research studies that focus on designing or researching computational technologies with or for people from underserved communities (e.g., empirical studies from IS-related fields such as HCI and CSCW). We will analyze how principles of participatory design (PD) and community-based participatory research (CBPR) are applied to these studies. This course will provide a critical understanding of established or perhaps unestablished research design methods, which support the creation and evaluation of ICT systems and services that would be equitable and beneficial to a broad range of users.2021
 Peer ProductionExploration of peer production the open collaborations that produce things like open source software and Wikipedia. Distinguishing peer production from different kinds of online collaborations such as crowdsourcing, citizen science, question and answer sites, and mere sharing of code.2021
 Personal InformaticsRepeatable with Different Topics
2019
 Photographic Materials In Cultural Heritage Institutions- topic description unavailable -2020
 Problematic and Misleading InformationExamines misinformation, disinformation and other forms of networked manipulation, which can function not only to deceive and create divisions, but also to diminish trust in information intermediaries such as journalism and science. Readings and activities provide the basis for exploring problems with, causes of and solutions to these phenomena. 2021
 Product and Project ManagementIntroduction to product and project management concepts as a foundation for UX, library sciences and other related fields. 2021
 Quantifying User ExperienceA practical introduction and guide for using statistics to solve quantitative problems in user research. Many designers and user researchers view usability and user research as qualitative activities, which do not use formulas and numbers. However, usability practitioners and user researchers are increasingly expected to quantify the benefits of their efforts. The impact of good and bad designs can be quantified in terms of user performance, task completion rates and times, perceived user satisfaction. The course will address questions frequently faced by user researchers, such as, how to compare usability of products for A/B testing and competitive analysis, how to measure the interaction behavior and attitudes of users, how to estimate the number of users needed for usability testing. The course will introduce students to a foundation for statistical theories and the best practices needed to apply them. It will cover descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, standardized usability questionnaires, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. It will also address how to effectively communicate the quantitative results.

2021
 Quantitative Methods In The Language SciencesThe course teaches natural language processing and statistics. As such it provides training in the programming languages R and Python. Discussions and readings will foster critique of the process of matching up data, research questions, and methods of analysis.2018
 Rapid Protoyping and Lean UX MethodologyIntroduction to basic design concepts such as composition, color theory, interactions; the Lean UX methodology, history, predecessor, pros/cons, and adaptations on Lean UX and case studies from companies such as Google; application of rapid prototyping using the latest design tools and methods2021
 Seminar: Propaganda, Deception, Manipulation, Technology, and the LawExamination of propaganda and disinformation campaigns, the psychology behind how they work and how they became central to both the Cold War and political elections; as well as the advent of social media and algorithmic optimization to facilitate and accelerate the reach and impact. 2021
 Technology Learning StudioIn this class we'll learn how to learn new technologies.
We'll do this in three ways: 1) we'll learn new technologies ourselves (70%), 2) as a studio group, we'll reflect critically on our learning processes (15%), and 3) we'll review some literature (academic and practitioner, formal and informal) on learning techniques (15%).
2021
 Technology and CultureIssues surrounding the ways in which media systems, old and new, have defining powers that go beyond the superficial notion of how they operate or which “audiences” they attract. Alternative conceptions of how technology figures in various aspects of society, including its supposed “impacts” on society, its role in creating and shaping broad information and cultural systems and the attendant political and economic reverberations.2021
 Technology of Network Security and Incident Response- topic description unavailable -2020
 Trust and Transparency In The Information SocietyThis course will explore three everyday information values: transparency, trust, and agency. We will apply these three everyday information values to three important contexts within the information society: science, politics, and mass media. This course will be particularly relevant to students in information studies, communication studies, radio-television-film, journalism, anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, management information studies, and public policy.2018
 User Behavior and Search ExperienceTheoretical and practical foundations for information professionals who wish to design and evaluate search systems and services, taking user-centered approaches. Search user interfaces, search behavior, search interaction, search user experience, and measures and methods for evaluating search systems. 2021
 Video Games: Access, Archives, and ValuesVideo games are cultural heritage artifacts that are increasingly more common in the
everyday world and hold large amounts of societal information and research value
within them. Because of this archivists and librarians are having to deal with the
challenges of how to properly provide access to and preserve video games. Topics
include: virtualization, emulation, copyright, DRM, providing access, research values,
and more.
2019
 Virtual EnvironmentsThe focus of the course is to examine people’s social and psychological experiences of virtual environments, such as in virtual reality. Through the course students will learn about the research behind people’s experiences of virtual environments. 2021
INF 385T.01Special Topics in Information Science: Presenting InformationVisual, numerical, textual, and verbal presentation of information based on fundamental theories of human information perception and communication. Examples may include tables, graphs, dashboards, infographics, and reports.
2021
INF 385T.02Special Topics in Information Science: VisualizationExamine the opportunities and challenges for using crowdsourcing to teach computers to "see".2021
INF 385T.03Special Topics in Information Science: Human Computation and CrowdsourcingIntroduction to the theory, methods, and applications of human computation and crowdsourcing; covering a breadth of key concepts as well as more specialized depth in one or more key sub-areas.
2020
INF 385T.04Special Topics in Information Science: Mobile Interaction DesignIntroduction to the design of mobile interactions with emphasis on research and analysis, conceptual design, mobile interface prototyping, and the basics of interface evaluation and usability testing.Not Yet Scheduled
INF 385T.05Special Topics in Information Science: Data MiningA hands-on introductory overview of the applications, methods, tools, and technologies that constitute data science and data mining. Fundamentals of Python and R programming languages and relevant libraries. A semester project applying the learned methods and technologies to a specific dataset.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 385T.06Special Topics in Information Science: Information Modeling An introduction to fundamental information modeling methods such as relational database design, conceptual modeling, markup systems, and ontologies.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 385T.07Special Topics in Information Science: Information Science in the Intelligence CommunityIntroduction to the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) and the world of espionage from a Library and Information Science perspective: how intelligence agencies collect, manage, and analyze data and information to produce actionable insights for policymakers.
2021
INF 385T.08Special Topics in Information Science: Information EthicsExamination of contemporary information ethics issues applying a variety of ethical theories, including non-Western and feminist theories.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 385T.09Special Topics in Information Science: Data WranglingAn introduction to working with data - reading a variety of formats, designing a database schema, and introductory programming skills for inserting, querying, and transforming of data.
2020
INF 385VHealth InformaticsIntroduction to health informatics; includes fundamentals of information in biomedicine, nursing, public health, bioinformatics and genomics, electronic records, and integrated systems.
2021
INF 385WSecurity InformaticsExplores information, computer, and network security in several contexts. Examines business impacts of security, societal implications of the protection of information resources, and technical aspects of securing information technology systems and data.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 386History of Information and Society (see individual class topics below)
 History of Information In The United StatesA survey of the history of information, with a focus on information professions and centers (e.g. libraries, archives, schools, museums, newspapers, social media, non-profit/for-profit corporations, government settings, etc.) in the United States over the last 150 years. Interdisciplinary examination of 'information' and its manifestations in historical but also philosophical, sociological, political, economic, journalistic, and technological contexts.2021
INF 386EInformation and Culture (see individual class topics below)
 Planning and Understanding ExhibitsExhibits are a powerful way for libraries, archives, museums, and cultural institutions to engage the public with their collections. This course offers students the opportunity to plan and install an exhibit, focusing on objectives such as: crafting a narrative around physical objects; drafting exhibit text; accommodating media preservation issues; building basic display supports; and publicizing the exhibit. Students will learn about the historical origins of modern-day exhibit practices, and will visit and evaluate current exhibits on campus and in the Austin area.2021
INF 386GGender, Technology, and InformationDefinitions of and metaphors for technologies; in-depth analysis of feminism and science and technologies studies, masculinities and technologies, woman's underrepresentation in technology, reproductive and sexual technologies, domestic technologies, design and architecture, book clubs and reading, and gender and (information) articulation work.

2021
INF 387Administration (see individual class topics below)
 School Library Management IDesigned for students pursuing Texas Education Agency (TEA) certification in school librarianship. Examine the philosophy, objectives, and management of the school library with an emphasis on standards and competencies, and the roles of the school librarian as collection curator, literacy leader, and program administrator.2021
INF 387CManaging Information OrganizationsManagement theory, concepts, processes, and practices as applied to information agencies and systems.
2021
INF 387TInformation Technology and WorkExamines the role information technology plays in modern work. Case studies of historical and modern examples of technology implementation and work transformation. Includes qualitative techniques, such as interviewing and observing, for data collection; data analysis; and presentation of data.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 388EHistorical Museums: Context and PracticeThe process of exhibit creation in historical museums, from planning through development to opening and maintenance, as a negotiation among stakeholders for influence on the story that is told. Students visit local historical museums and examine how presentations are influenced by the institutional position of the museum, including its history and resources; the concerns of museum employees; the influence of the audience and of those who are directly affected or represented by an exhibit; and the role of contractual professionals.
2021
INF 388K.01Public LibrariesHistory, missions, values, governance, funding, services, user communities, architecture, leadership, and issues in public librarianship.
2021
INF 388K.05Rare Book and Special CollectionsAdministration of rare book and manuscript collections. Introduction to analytical bibliography.
2018
INF 388K.06Law LibrariesOverview of law librarianship, the discipline of law, and the culture of the legal environment, including the context in which law librarians, legal publishers, and other legal information professionals work.
2020
INF 388LProfessional Experience and Project Study of a practical problem, current phenomenon, or professional issue in an institutional setting.

Conference course.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.
2021
INF 388RPracticum in School LibrariesDesigned for students pursuing Texas Education Agency (TEA) certification in school librarianship. Fieldwork in varied school library settings under the supervision of qualified personnel.

At least 160 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

Participants will not ordinarily receive monetary compensation.
2021
INF 388TInternship in Libraries and Other Information AgenciesSupervised fieldwork.

Minimum 125 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

May not be counted toward any degree in the School of Information.

Required Form: https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/images/iSchool_x88T_Application_Form.pdf
2021
INF 389EIntroduction to Records ManagementSystems for controlling recorded information in an organizational setting.2021
INF 389GIntroduction to Electronic and Digital RecordsExamines personal recordkeeping and information management to explore the creation, management, and preservation of digital information. Includes current developments in digital technology that affect recordkeeping.
2019
INF 389JAppraisal and Selection of RecordsInvestigates the history, theory, and practice of selecting and appraising records information for permanent or quasi-permanent retention in an archival environment. Explores influences of other stakeholders on the selection and appraising process.
2021
INF 389MIntroduction to Issues in Records InformationExploration of the fundamentals of records information and their role in society.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 389RIntroduction to Archival Enterprise IIntroduction to the records aspect of archival enterprise, from acquisition to use, with emphasis on arrangement and description.
2021
INF 389SIntroduction to Archival Enterprise IIAdministrative and professional issues, including organizing the work of a repository, management issues, marketing, space, law, and ethics.
2020
INF 390CCopyright: Legal and Cultural PerspectivesDigital and other important communication technologies; how copyright in the United States developed and has evolved; and copyright seen from a number of disciplinary points of view, such as legal studies, cultural history, and public policy. Other subjects may include the cultural commons; natural rights arguments for copyright versus social bargain and statutory arguments; identifying and protecting the public interest in information; the law of copyright and cultural categories such as the author, the work, intellectual property, and creation; and important federal court cases.
2021
INF 390NInformation Policy (see individual class topics below)
 Communication Law and PolicyThis topic examines the U.S. communication policy in light of domestic and international structural, economic and technological changes. We will investigate how notions of control, access and expression have changed during the 20th and the 21st centuries, examining communication policies and regulation against a backdrop of technological innovation. Our point of departure is that definitions of and debates on what constitutes the public interest intersect with policies for broadcasting, cablecasting, computer networks (the Internet) and various other telecommunications systems. The course begins by examining some of the framing documents and events that established expectations about how communications and telecommunications systems should function in American society and with what goals; the course pursues the events and shifts in broadcasting, cable, telephony, and network communication (particularly the Internet) history in order to discover how original conceptualizations have become wedded to marketplace notions. 2020
 Communication and Information PolicyCritical examination of conflicts and trends in information policy in private organizations and in federal, state, and international public-sector organizations.

Repeatable with Different Topics
2018
 Cybersecurity Law and PolicyA deep dive into a broad range of legal and policy issues associated with cybersecurity, intended as a comprehensive introduction to the topic and the many public and private institutions involved in it.2021
 Internet/Information PolicyThe Internet/Information Policy course is a survey course relevant for students interested in understanding the varied components of information Policy and in engaging in depth study or practical experience with an aspect of Information Policy of particular interest to the individual student. Topics covered in the course include Information Economics; Data, Information, and Open Data and Applications in Planning and Policy Making; Community Informatics; Information Security; Cybersecurity and Global Internet Governance; Hacktivism and Social Media; Artificial Intelligence and the Future Workforce; and Planning and Policy Applications for the Future of Information and the Internet of Things; among others.

Students will engage in readings, practical experiences, and guest lectures to cover the subject matter and will be responsible for completing an individual or group project related to a topic of their choosing within the purview of Information Policy. Students will have the opportunity to engage in local technology projects with Austin City Council related to connecting City Council members to timely, relevant data for evidence-based policy making, as well as projects related to artificial intelligence and transportation and artificial Intelligence and the future workforce.

Examples of student projects include exploring how information architecture plays a role in community informatics and regional planning, conducting field research to understand how user design plays a role in open data and local policy making, researching cybersecurity policies and enhancements or hindrances to economic growth, developing a model organizational design to exploit information flows for better policy or economic outcomes, designing an app for disease mitigation, discovering the regulatory barriers to financial inclusion in mobile banking, understanding and exploring any role 3D printing might play in affecting health and health informatics, connecting businesses and local organizations to open data to spur innovation, and those yet to be unleashed by the student imagination.
2018
 Privacy, Surveillance, and National SecurityIntroduction to U.S. federal information policy, with emphasis on privacy and surveillance in the post-9/11 environment and brief consideration of American intelligence work. Theories of surveillance and privacy. Inherent tensions between democratic and open civil society and security concerns of the state. Primacy and critique of risk assessment as the framework for U.S. security decisions. Understanding historical bases of policy issues, identifying important sources of consensus and dissensus about policy issues, identifying key policy stakeholders and actors, and recognition that reasonable people will disagree about what can and should be done about important policy issues and that the policy system aims to reveal and adjudicate among conflicting perspectives and value judgments.2020
 Strategic Communications For National SecurityThis seminar will examine the history and modern practice of strategic communications, focusing on how government agencies use information campaigns to shape foreign perceptions of national security issues. Through selected readings, lectures, class discussions, and research, participants will examine how the U.S. government and, to a lesser extent, foreign governments develop and implement information campaigns to support strategic communications objectives. Using case studies that include Cold War crises, 9/11, Iraq, and Afghanistan, the seminar will identify factors that contribute to successful, and less than successful, efforts to inform, influence, and persuade foreign publics to support-€or at least not actively oppose-€U.S. national security objectives. The seminar will also consider the limitations of communications and public diplomacy as instruments of "soft power" and examine how new technologies such as social media affect policymakers' ability to influence the attitudes of foreign audiences.2019
INF 390PTopics in PrivacyPolicy, value systems, and critical theory regarding privacy, studied from historical, sociological, feminist, or other perspectives.

Repeatable with Different Topics
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 391D.06Directed ReadingsThe individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration. 2021
INF 391D.07Directed ResearchThe individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the Graduate Coordinator for registration.
2021
INF 391D.10Survey of Information StudiesAn overview of the major ideas, concepts, and theories of information studies.
2021
INF 391D.11The Research EnterpriseAn overview of the nature and purposes of research, and common methods and methodologies in information studies.
2021
INF 391D.12Disciplinary Foundations For Information StudiesAn overview of concepts, results, and perspectives from philosophical, social science, humanistic, design, and technological disciplines that provide important underpinnings for information studies.
2021
INF 391EAdvanced Topics in Information Studies (see individual class topics below)
 Work in the Age of AI, Robots, and AlgorithmsIn this doctoral seminar, we will examine the claims, the current reality, and likely futures of work in the age of these new technologies. Beyond examining the relevant economic arguments about the predicted size and composition of the workforce, our exploration will include consideration of ethics, system design (e.g., control, transparency, human role), organization design, technology designers, and new forms of work (e.g., crowdworking, precarious jobs, platform work). In addition, we’ll take a close look at three work sectors in which nascent systems are in place: medicine, policing/justice/law, and journalism. 2018
INF 391FAdvanced Topics in Research Methods, Methodologies, and Design (see individual class topics below)
 Experimental Design- topic description unavailable -2019
 Qualitative Research MethodsExplores a variety of approaches to qualitative methods including ethnography, participant observation, case studies, grounded theory, phenomenology, action research, and so forth. Students will have a hands-on opportunity to conduct their own research project in which they will learn, discuss, and reflect upon the procedures of qualitative research.

2021
INF 391GDoctoral Writing SeminarIntensive writing, critique, and rewriting to assist senior doctoral students with refining their research writing in preparation for qualifying papers, dissertation proposals, and formal publications.

May be repeated for credit.
2021
INF 392CPreservation Administration and ServicesTheory and practice of preservation administration and services. Problems in planning, organizing, and implementing preservation work in libraries, archives, and museums.

May be repeated for credit.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 392EMaterials in Libraries, Archives, and MuseumsUnderlying factors in the physical nature of materials; concepts of permanence, durability, and deterioration; challenges of both traditional and modern collections; emphasis on print and photographic collections.
2021
INF 392FRisk Assessment and Collections ManagementAgents of deterioration, including physical forces, security, disaster, and environmental conditions; risk assessment, strategies to reduce risk, and personal safety.
2018
INF 392GManagement of Preservation ProgramsManagement of specific preservation strategies for cultural record; preservation policy; the selection process for preservation; minor mending and repair operations; library binding and conservation treatment; preservation assessments; emergency preparedness; contracting for services; and budgeting, grant writing, and fund- raising for preservation.
2021
INF 392HCreating Sustainable Digital CollectionsHands-on activities that focus on building sustainable collections of digitized resources. Designed to help students gain curatorial understanding of the media to be digitized and knowledge of and experience with the technical and managerial aspects of the digitization process. Includes creation of metadata and digital preservation strategies for long-term access.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 392KDigital Archiving and PreservationExamines the permanent archiving of digital information. Covers media refreshment, emulation, migration, and electronic records repository construction and administration. Case study projects involving campus repositories and off-campus institutions. Students use legacy hardware and software and digital forensics tools to preprocess digital collections for repository storage. Also explores issues in long-term electronic records preservation.
2020
INF 392LIntroduction to Audio Preservation and ReformattingStudy of audio recording through a chronological examination of the development of recording; basic care and preservation of recordings; economics of audio preservation; and stability concerns of modern media.
2021
INF 392MAdvanced Audio Preservation and ReformattingExploration of changing concepts in the nature of audio information in different formats, issues of access within the context of preservation, criteria for prioritization of materials to be reformatted, considerations in invasive versus minimal restoration, and study of rare formats.
2020
INF 392PThe Politics of PreservationIntroduction to the components of the media industries, using the available literature as well as the University's film and video resources. The course employs both a theoretical and a practical approach to the archival media product. Debate over defining historical media material as artifact complements discussion of the realities of digitization and physical deterioration.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 393CConservation Laboratory Techniques (see individual class topics below)
 Introduction to Paper ConservationIntroduction to the ethical principles of conservation; conservation documentation; and hands-on treatment techniques for prolonging the lifetime of cultural materials. 2021
 Preservation Science and PracticeIn this course, students learn collections care strategies that enable today's information stewards to protect our growing cultural record. Scientific foundations and practical exercises will address common preservation challenges, such as environmental control, mold, insects, pollutants, and light damage. Modern topics in health, safety, and sustainability will highlight the developing nature of the field. Students will evaluate preservation risks for books, paper, electronic media, and other collections materials.2021
INF 393C.10Treatment Techniques for Flat PaperBasic techniques for care and handling of paper materials including but not limited to mending, dry cleaning, humidification and flattening, exhibit design and installation, enclosures, and documentation.
2020
INF 393C.11Treatment Techniques for Bound MaterialsBasic techniques for care and handling of bound materials including but not limited to sewing structure, minor mends, and enclosures.
2021
INF 397Research in Information Studies (see individual class topics below)
 Applied StatisticsDevelop foundational skills and confidence in quantitative methods for industry or academic jobs. Learn to use quantitative information to identify, evaluate, and solve problems in logical, empirically-based, accessible ways. Topics include: probability, statistical inference (Bayesian, frequentist), basic statistics, terminology, quantitative methods, and applied research practices. Students will use software for description, estimation, comparison, and explanation. Develop skills for identifying utility, limitations, and ethics of specific methods for industry research, advanced coursework, or independent learning. No prior statistical experience required. Opportunities to customize project to experience and career goals (e.g., UX/UI/user research, data science HCI, evaluation research in archives, academic publications)2021
 Digital Toolkits for Historicism- topic description unavailable -2018
 Qualitative Research with Readers and Designers of TextSeminar discussing the assumptions, methods, successes, and limitations of various strands of qualitative research, with special emphasis on observational approaches employed in writing studies research. History of qualitative research in writing studies as well as its underlying theory and ethics.2021
 Statistical Analysis and LearningLarge datasets are increasingly becoming available across many sectors such as healthcare, energy, and online markets. This course focuses on methods that allow learning from such datasets to uncover underlying relationships and patterns in the data, with a focus on predictive performance of various models that can be built to represent the underlying function generating the data. The course starts with a review of basic statistical concepts and linear regression. But the course will focus mostly on classification and clustering based on non-regression techniques such as tree-based approaches, support vector machines, and unsupervised learning. In the problem sets and tutorials we will examine applications in: healthcare; energy; transportation; online markets; and patent systems. Topics will include Linear Regression, Classification, Resampling Methods, Linear Model Selection and Regularization, Tree-Based Methods, Support Vector Machines, Unsupervised Learning. In covering the material from the assigned textbook (see below), this course will emphasize both on formulaic and conceptual understanding of the discussed methods. As necessary, the instructor will draw on material from outside the textbook for driving conceptual clarity.2019
INF 397.02Practicum in ResearchThe individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

2021
INF 397CUnderstanding Research Survey of the goals, methods, processes, and products of systematic inquiry. Designed to prepare students to critically evaluate information studies research.
2019
INF 397DBibliography and Methods in Historical ResearchSources of information for and techniques of conducting investigations in history.
Not Yet Scheduled
INF 398RMaster's ReportPreparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

The individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

Master's Report Guide: Master's_Report_Guide.docx

NOTE: Besides working with their individual Faculty Supervisors, students must also contact the instructors of INF 388L/R in order to attend aggregated Capstone class meetings during the times currently scheduled for INF 388L/R. All Capstone courses require student participation in an end-of-semester poster session. Please see poster session guidelines at http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/programs/masters/capstone/poster_session_guidelines for further information.

2021
INF 398TSupervised Teaching in Information StudiesTeaching strategies for course design, syllabus creation, material development, classroom activities, student engagement, and grading. Additional subjects may include negotiation of course load and timing, course marketing, TA management, online teaching, and doctoral teaching/advising.

May be repeated for credit as a teaching practicum.
2020
INF 399WDissertationWriting of the dissertation. The individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

May be repeated for credit.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.
2021
INF 698AThesisThe individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

Master's Thesis Proposal form: PDF | DOC

NOTE: All Capstone courses require student participation in an end-of-semester poster session. Please see poster session guidelines at http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/programs/masters/capstone/poster_session_guidelines for further information.
2021
INF 698BThesisThe individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

Master's Thesis Guide: masters_thesis_guide.doc

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

NOTE: Besides working with their individual Faculty Supervisors, students must also contact the instructors of INF 388L/R in order to attend aggregated Capstone class meetings during the times currently scheduled for INF 388L/R. All Capstone courses require student participation in an end-of-semester poster session. Please see poster session guidelines at http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/programs/masters/capstone/poster_session_guidelines for further information.
2021
INF 699WDissertationWriting of the dissertation. The individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

May be repeated for credit.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.
2021
INF 999WDissertationWriting of the dissertation. The individual student works under supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Students must present the faculty member's name to the graduate coordinator for registration.

May be repeated for credit.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.
2021
ISP 189Individual StudiesIn-depth study of a problem or topic related to Information Security and Privacy.

Individual Instruction. May be repeated for credit.

ISP 189 is worth 1 hour of semester credit. Students wanting 2 or 3 hours of credit should take ISP 289 or INF 389 respectively.
2021
ISP 289Individual StudiesIn-depth study of a problem or topic related to Information Security and Privacy.

Individual Instruction. May be repeated for credit.

ISP 289 is worth 2 hours of semester credit. Students wanting 1 or 3 hours of credit should take ISP 189 or INF 389 respectively.
2021
ISP 380Introduction to Information Security and Privacy Explore foundational concepts of information security and privacy, including information value, classifications, threats, liabilities and risk management, identity and access controls (IAM), trust frameworks, technology for network, web, software and cloud security; and privacy laws and regulations.2021
ISP 381 Information and Privacy in SocietyExamine how information is socially and culturally variable and fluid, changing throughout history and differing from place to place. Explore the anthropological study of information; societal norms; and individual, device, communal, and organizational information strategies.2021
ISP 382Public Policy, Information Security, and PrivacyExplore an overview of how information and public policy relate to each other. Examine key information policy areas including privacy, surveillance, theft, health information, business-to-business relationships, and the co-evolution of personal data and information technologies.Not Yet Scheduled
ISP 383Business Governance and Controls for Information Security and PrivacyExplore an organizational perspective on the management and governance of information. Examine business practices and governance mechanisms for minimizing risks and maximizing returns of information.2021
ISP 384Strategic Communication for Information Security and PrivacyExplore framing messages and the impact on people, organizations, risks and privacy; effective crisis management communications; communication and business continuity planning; time management; sense making processes in organizational crisis; and reputation management.2021
ISP 385 Information Risk and Benefit AnalysisExplore and evaluate the risks and benefits related to information in multiple sectors including financial services, healthcare, consumer services, government, education, and energy.2020
ISP 385TTopics in Information Security and PrivacyStudy the characteristics of information and the technologies, stakeholders, and questions involved in managing, protecting, and securing information.
Not Yet Scheduled
ISP 386Information SecurityExplore the enrollment and authentication for cyber and physical access and transactions, cryptography, biometrics, device identity security, and security culture.
2021
ISP 387Information Management and RepositoriesExplore knowledge and data management, storage, and mining. Examine information representation and algorithms. Discuss information security and privacy applications in all market sectors for enrollment, authentication, operational use, fraud detection, and fraud prevention.2021
ISP 388Law Governing Information Security and PrivacyExamine laws and other policy instruments related to information security and privacy, different classes of protected personal information, and multiple genres of legal information and legal writing. Explore legal requirements and social responsibilities as they pertain to data protection and the prevention of different types of fraud and information crimes.2021
ISP 388LProfessional Experience and ProjectStudy practical problems, current phenomenon, or professional issues in an institutional setting.
2021
ISP 389Individual StudiesIn-depth study of a problem or topic related to Information Security and Privacy.

Individual Instruction. May be repeated for credit.

ISP 389 is worth 3 hours of semester credit. Students wanting 1 or 2 hours of credit should take ISP 189 or INF 289 respectively.
2021
ISP 389RMaster's ReportPreparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option.
2021