All News

She++ Advancing Women In Technology

April 1, 2014

Sometimes just hearing another woman's experience can plant the seed of possibility.

That's what Marcia McIntosh, a second-year student, found last year when she attended a screening and discussion of the documentary She++. The event, organized by the iSchool's AWIT (Advancing Women in Technology) committee, revealed some troubling statistics. In 2009, the film reports, women earned 52 percent of the math and science degree in the U.S. but only 18 percent of technology-related degrees.

Faculty Profile: Karen Wickett

April 1, 2014

When she was in the second grade, Karen Wickett won the "What the Library Means to Me" essay contest.

It's not an honor she lists on her CV, and she laughs when she remembers how she worked a reference to elephants into the piece.

But her essay included a prescient observation about libraries: "There is a whole world in there to discover."

iSchool Alumna Honored at the White House

April 1, 2014

Some educators at a White House gathering said they were hesitant at first to bring new technology into their classrooms. Austin's Eanes school district librarian Carolyn Foote said her attitude has always been, "Why not?" Foote said the "aha moment" where she understood the importance of iPads was while working with a disabled student. He didn't have the fine motor skills to turn the pages of books, but he could flip through pages on an iPad. It gave the student a level of independence he never had before, and Foote wanted to share that independence with all students.

iSchool Careers: Speed Interviewing

April 1, 2014

When Stefanie Roberts froze up on the first question of the Speed Interviewing event in February, the irony wasn't lost on her.

The question? "What makes you an effective communicator, and what can you do to improve your communication?"

Roberts, who started at the iSchool in January, recovered, gave her answer and, more importantly, received constructive feedback. Then, feeling more poised, she moved on to another table where a different interviewer threw another question at her. Within an hour, she had fielded 12 questions from 12 different people.

Giving Profile - Jane Garner

Feb. 28, 2014

For Jane Garner, a crushing disappointment could not have come at a better time.

It was the summer of 1964, and the recent University of Texas graduate was in Washington training to become a Peace Corps librarian in Chile. At the end of the summer, Garner was told her perfectionist nature would 'cause too much trouble.' She was effectively kicked out of the Peace Corps.

iSchool Alum, Phil Metzger, Pays it Forward by Funding a Student Scholarship

Feb. 28, 2014

Just as the new school year began, the iSchool received a generous gift to directly support a student studying in the area of rare books and conservation. Dr. Metzger decided the best way to ensure the continuing scholarly focus in the area most meaningful to him was to designate his annual gift as a student scholarship in rare books and conservation.

David Arctur Makes Major Gift to the iSchool

Feb. 28, 2014

David Arctur has worked as an electrical engineer, a software architect and an urban planner among other things. His career has taken him from Austin to Africa to Silicon Valley and back to Austin. His academic titles include research fellow in the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Cockrell School of Engineering and instructor at the iSchool.

He jokes that he should be retired by now.

Digital Archive Holds Untold History of African American Mental Health

Feb. 7, 2014

Resplendent in his trademark sport coat and bow tie, Louis Armstrong plays a trumpet for a large gathering of patients underneath a grove of trees outside of Central State Hospital, the world's first African American psychiatric hospital in Petersburg, Virginia. This is one of the many priceless images stored away in the hospital's filing cabinets that were on the brink of destruction. Due to changes in Virginia's records retention laws, any hospital document over 10 years old had to be destroyed-one hundred years of historic materials lost forever.

Visiting professor discusses progression of online social networks

Feb. 7, 2014

In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, when most Americans were checking Twitter for updates on the manhunt, Boston College professor Jerry Kane was checking Twitter to analyze the network itself.

At a research colloquium hosted by the School of Information on Tuesday, Kane spoke about what social media technology has done to modern human relationships.

Tanya Clement Awarded A Second NEH Grant

Feb. 3, 2014

Even digitized, unprocessed sound collections, which hold important cultural artifacts such as poetry readings, story telling, speeches, oral histories, and other performances of the spoken word remain largely inaccessible.