Snowden Becker

Snowden Becker

Snowden Becker has been a leader in the field of moving image archives and amateur film preservation since 2001. She is a co-founder of the international Home Movie Day event and the non-profit Center for Home Movies, and has hosted a number of local Home Movie Day events in Los Angeles and Austin, Texas over the last ten years. She holds an MLIS degree from UCLA; her doctoral work at UT, currently in progress, explores the archival aspects of evidence management practices in law enforcement agencies, which is just one of many research areas that have grown out of her long-standing interest in home movies and amateur film. She has also written, taught workshops, and presented on a wide variety of other topics, including the use of home movies in the study of autism and mental illness; home movies as historical evidence and public records; and incorporating amateur films into multi-disciplinary research and teaching projects.

Specializations:  Archives, preservation, audiovisual materials


Carol Brock

Carol Brock

Carol Brock is a Certified Records Manager and the Records Management Expert for IQ Business Group. She is currently working with DOI to implement enterprise-wide content management using auto-categorization. She is the former Director of Information Assets for the US Government Accountability Office. She successfully spearheaded a NARA pilot project for simplified records scheduling and implemented an enterprise-wide electronic recordkeeping system for which she earned the National Archivist’s Achievement Award. She has 27 years of Federal RM experience as a contractor, consultant, and Federal employee. Carol is also a Research Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin working on a Ph.D. in Digital Preservation. Carol is an active member of ARMA and AIIM: in June 2010, she provided invited expert testimony, “Federal Electronic Records Management: A Status Report” on behalf of ARMA, International before the Subcommittee on Information Policy, Census, and National Archives of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

Degrees:  • Pursing a Ph.D. in Digital Preservation and Information Policy, School of Information, University of Texas at Austin, 2009 to present. • Master of Science in Library and Information Science, University of Texas at Austin, 1986. • Bachelor of Science, Library Science/Elementary Education, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 1982.

Specializations:  Digital preservation and Federal information policy.

Committee:  Dr. Patricia Galloway (Chair), Dr. Philip Doty

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Julia Bullard

I'm a doctoral candidate and am writing my dissertation on a volunteer-run classification system for a large-scale fanfiction repository. With an interest in infrastructure and values in design, I study information organization systems. I employ qualitative methods, primarily ethnography, to help me understand the design of such systems. I publish my work in information studies, human-computer interaction, and computer-supported cooperative work.

Degrees:  BA in English, 2006, St. Francis Xavier University; MA in Cultural Studies & Critical Theory, 2007, McMaster University; MLIS, 2010, University of British Columbia

Specializations:  Information organization; Values-in-design; Community-based information system design

Committee:  Melanie Feinberg & Diane Bailey (Chair), Bill Aspray, David Ribes, Karen Wickett

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Sam Burns

Sam Burns

Sam Burns is a doctoral candidate studying how people collect, collaborate, describe, and share information on the Web. He has worked in the information professions since 1995 as an archivist, records manager, business planner, systems administrator, and currently as a Web content coordinator at the School of Information.

Degrees:  B.S. History & Social Sciences, Florida State University; M.S. Information Studies, the University of Texas at Austin

Specializations:  human-computer interaction, systems analysis & design, usability, web metadata

Committee:  Andrew Dillon (Chair), Randolph Bias, Patricia Galloway, Clay Spinuzzi


Daniel Carter

Daniel studies how emerging technologies influence the production of knowledge about the social world. His current research focus on how forms of data and computational techniques spread between different communities.

Degrees:  M.A. in English Literature, 2011, The Ohio State University B.A. in Interdisciplinary Honors, 2006, University of Texas at Austin

Specializations:  sociology of knowledge, science and technology studies, social media research, digital humanities


Yung-Sheng Chang

Yung-Sheng Chang

Yung-Sheng Chang is a doctoral student in the School of Information at The University of Texas at Austin. He received a bachelor degree in Psychology at National Chung Cheng University and a master degree in Industrial Engineering specializing in Human Factors at National Tsing Hua University. After graduation, he had one and a half year experience working as a research assistant. Currently Yung-Sheng is studying relevance criteria users use in information retrieval.

Degrees:  B.S. in Psychology, 2011, National Chung Cheng University; M.S. in Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, 2013, National Tsing Hua University

Specializations:  Human Computer Interaction, Usability, Human Factors, Information Relevance

Committee:  Jacek Gwizdka  (Chair), Matthew Lease, Yan Zhang


Johanna Cohoon

Johanna Cohoon

Johanna Cohoon studies scientific research practices and tools. Johanna previously worked at the Center for Open Science where she researched reproducibility in Psychology. She is interested in open science practices—why and when people participate in them—as well as the tools that encourage transparency in research.

Degrees:  B.A. in Cognitive Science, 2013, University of Virginia

Specializations:  open science, reproducibility, scientific policy, software development, persuasive technology

Committee:  James Howison (Chair), Tanya Clement, Andrew Dillon


Jin Gao

I came to the iSchool at 2012 Fall. My personal interest is human computer interaction, health informatics and technology.

Specializations:  User interaction design


Nicholas Gottschlich

Nicholas Gottschlich

Nick Gottschlich is a first-year doctoral student with an interest in researching social media interactions and online anonymity. He is interested in how people's behavior changes online when they are anonymous versus when their identity is tied to their posts.

Degrees:  B.S.E. in Computer Science, 2015, University of Michigan

Specializations:  Technology, Social Network Analysis

Committee:  James Howison (Chair), Ken Fleischmann, Matthew Lease


Jane Gruning

Jane Gruning

My research interests lie at the intersection of digital preservation and human-computer interaction. Specifically, I am interested in how people think about and relate to digital objects, and how that is affected by user interfaces. Digital objects are often referred to as ephemeral, intangible, and "not-real," and I'm interested in whether these conceptions are widespread, and how they affect our interactions with these objects. Additionally, I am Lecia Barker's research assistant for the NSF-funded Research on Faculty Change project, for which we are investigating how changes in teaching practices can increase the retention of traditionally underrepresented groups in computer science education.

Degrees:  B.A. in English Literature, 2004, Loyola University of New Orleans; M.A. in Philosophy, 2009, Tulane University; M.S.I.S., 2011, The University of Texas at Austin

Specializations:  human computer interaction, digital preservation

Committee:  Ciaran Trace (Chair), Lecia Barker, Andrew Dillon, Melanie Feinberg, Siân Lindley

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Ayse Gursoy

Ayse is a third year doctoral student interested in video and computer game preservation, and in the relationship of archival practice to scholarship. She is curious about how the intellectual model of the artifact, such as "game as software object," engages with the preservation strategies employed, e.g., emulation.

Degrees:  A.B. in English, 2011, Princeton University; S.M. in Comparative Media Studies, 2013, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Specializations:  archives, digital archives, digital preservation, video and computer games, digital humanities

Committee:  Melanie Feinberg, Karen Wickett (Chair), Ciaran Trace, Tanya Clement, Diane Bailey


Nida Kazim

Nida Kazim

Nida Kazim is a 4th year Phd student and her research interest is women in technology, specifically, Pakistani women in technology. For her Masters thesis, Nida worked with Pakistani women who were teaching computer-related technology in Pakistan, and explored barriers they encountered, their reasons for choosing the field, and how they felt they were perceived by Pakistani society. For her dissertation, Nida plans on exploring this field further and uncovering similar areas of interest for Pakistani women who are actively enrolled in technology-related programs in the United States.. Before her life as an aspiring academic, Nida worked as a technical Project Manager for a financial and services company, and has firsthand experience on being a woman in technology. She thinks that this experience helps in her understanding the subject matter, and aims to understand the field not just as someone who has experienced it, but as an academic.

Degrees:  B.S - Information Technology - Illinois State University M.S - Information Technology, Project Management - Illinois State University

Specializations:  information technology, women in technology, pakistani women, career choices

Committee:  Dr. Lecia Barker (Chair), Dr. Phil Doty, Dr. Lynn Westbrook, Dr. Hina Azam


Kolina Koltai

Kolina Koltai

Kolina "Koko" Koltai is a doctoral student working under the advisement of Dr. Kenneth R. Fleischmann. Her previous employment has been as a research contractor on collaborative projects with NASA, AFRL (Air Force Research Lab), and other government institutions that focused the relationship between automation transparency and trust. Her current research interests include trust in automated systems and information, decision making in scientific controversies, implicit stereotyping and bias, and AYA oncology survivorship.

Degrees:  B.A. in Psychology and Asian American Studies, minor in Human Sexuality, California State University Northridge, 2012

Specializations:  human computer interaction, automation transparency, stereotyping and bias, trust assessment of information

Committee:  Kenneth R. Fleischmann (Chair), Andrew Dillion, Diane Bailey


Virginia Luehrsen

Virginia Luehrsen

Virginia Luehrsen is a PhD candidate at the University of Texas at Austin School of Information, where her research focuses on the intersections between disaster recovery, indigenous knowledge creation and management, and information practice. Besides studies, she has designed and taught two different undergraduate courses at the School of Information - “Preservation and Representation of Cultural Heritage Information” and “Research Strategies”. Virginia has also spent several years working in government and higher education administration, including in areas of disaster and crisis management, and currently serves as a student affairs specialist under the Vice President of Student Affairs at UT-Austin. Outside the academy, Virginia volunteers with various groups, including Hands-on Housing, Gold Ribbon Rescue, and Austin Pets Alive. She also is a classically trained singer and musician, and participates in various local musical groups as both an ensemble member and soloist.

Degrees:  MA - Folklore and Ethnomusicology (Indiana University - Bloomington) MLS - Rare Books and Manuscripts (Indiana University - Bloomington) BA - International Relations, History; Minor - Central Asian Studies (University of Wisconsin - Madison)

Specializations:  Preservation Disaster Response and Recovery Politics of Indigineity LIS Education Assistive Technologies Rare Books and Special Collections


Stephen Reid McLaughlin

Stephen Reid McLaughlin

Stephen McLaughlin is a PhD student at the University of Texas at Austin School of Information. He has worked as a Senior Editor at the PennSound poetry archive and hosts the podcast 'Into the Field' for Jacket2.org. His writing has appeared in Gauss PDF, The Volta, and 'Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing.' Stephen’s current work is focused on alternative distribution channels for academic articles and books.

Degrees:  B.A. in English, 2008, University of Pennsylvania

Specializations:  open access, access to knowledge, copyright, file sharing, privacy

Committee:  Tanya Clement (Chair), Diane Bailey, Philip Doty

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Eunyoung Moon

Eunyoung Moon

Eunyoung Moon has broad research interests in Open Collaboration. The focus of her research has been on Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) development, investigating organizational aspects in FLOSS development that is realized by both geographically distributed volunteers and corporately employed participants involving rich organizational ties. She has been fascinated by how the structure of FLOSS and organizational circumstance of FLOSS projects evolve over time. She is, currently, much interested in organizational dynamics in FLOSS projects, drawing on theories from the discipline of organizational studies and empirical software engineering.

Degrees:  B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering, 2007, Ewha Womans University (Summa Cum Laude); M.S. in Graduate School of Culture Technology, 2010, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

Specializations:  Open Collaboration, Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) development, Software evolution

Committee:  James Howison (Chair), Diane Bailey, Lecia Barker, Wenhong Chen

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April Norris

April Norris

I'm a doctoral candidate in the iSchool at UTexas@Austin. My dissertation research focuses on the management and preservation of legal records, especially multi-form/format state government litigation records. My approach to research is ethnographically grounded, and explores the participation of relevant communities of practice (i.e. legal, records, and archival professionals) in the appraisal of legal records for long-term preservation. Professionally, I have 10+ years of experience in information governance, specifically consulting on and managing state government records. I have worked at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission, the University of Texas System Administration, and currently I am employed by the Office of the Attorney General of Texas.

Degrees:  M.S. in Information Studies & Endorsement of Specialization in Digital Preservation (University of Texas at Austin, 2006);
                B.A. in English w/ minor in classic civilizations (University of Texas at Austin, 2001)

Specializations:  Information Governance, Government Records Management, Legal Records Management, and Digital Archives & Preservation.

Committee:  Dr. Patricia Galloway (Chair),  Dr. Philip Doty,  Dr. Ciaran Trace


Carlos Ovalle

Carlos Ovalle is a doctoral student, information technology coordinator, and sometimes lecturer at the School of Information. He manages the information technology lab, its teaching assistants and other technology resources. He has been an American Library Association Copyright Scholar. His major areas of study include copyright and its effects on different communities (often cultural institutions), open access and digital archives.

Specializations:  copyright, digital archives, digital libraries, information policy, intellectual freedom, open access, technologies


Katie Pierce Meyer

I intend to contribute to an active discussion between professionals in libraries, archives and museums and the architectural community to help create collaborative relationships that can result in the sustainability of records that document the built environment. I bring my background as an archivist and training as an architectural historian to my research that focuses on the socio-technical environment in which architectural records are created. My primary concern is a disconnection between contemporary practices in architecture, engineering, and construction and the ability of cultural institutions to preserve the industry’s records. I believe that actively working with the community that generates records is crucial to the long-term preservation of records, particularly as the field continues to adopt new computer-aided design technologies.

Degrees:  BA in Philosophy, Southwestern University MS in Information Studies, The University of Texas at Austin MA in Architectural History, The University of Texas at Austin

Specializations:  archives digital archives and preservation architectural artifacts and records architectural history museum studies

Committee:  Dr. Philip Doty (Chair), Dr. Patricia Galloway Dr. Tanya Clement Dr. Steven Moore


Tanya Rabourn


Md Mustafizur Rahman

Md Mustafizur Rahman

Md Mustafizur Rahman is a first year PhD student at the School of Information, University of Texas at Austin. He is interested in Deep Learning and its applications to Information Retrieval, Natural Language Processing, Text Data Analysis and Crowd Computing. Dr. Matthew Lease is his PhD supervisor. Before joining iSchool, he completed his Masters in Computer Science from the University of Virginia.

Degrees:  Masters in Computer Science, 2016, University of Virginia, Virginia, USA, M.Sc. in Computer Science & Engineering, 2013, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh, B.Sc. in Computer Science & Engineering, 2011, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh

Specializations:  Information Retrieval, Machine Learning, Text Mining, Data Mining, Deep Learning

Committee:  Matthew Lease  (Chair), Unmil P. Karadkar, Edison Thomaz

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George Royer

George Royer

Degrees:  B.A. English, 2002, Birmingham-Southern College, J.D. University of Alabama School of Law, 2005, M.S,I.S. University of Texas at Austin School of Information, 2010.

Specializations:  Design, Human Computer Interactino, Privacy, Games, Health Informatics, Information History

Committee:  William Aspray (Chair), Kate Catterall, Tanya Clement, Andrew Dillon, Patricia Galloway


Dan Sholler

Dan Sholler

Dan studies the relationships between occupational changes and the use of information communication technologies (ICTs) in development projects and in organizations. He focuses on the changes experienced by workers upon the introduction and use of ICTs in everyday practice. Currently, he is investigating the influence of electronic medical record (EMR) and clinical decision support system (CDSS) implementations on the practices and communication patterns of physicians and other healthcare practitioners. Prior to becoming a doctoral student in the iSchool, Dan completed his undergraduate work at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of History and Sociology of Science.

Degrees:  B.A. Science, Technology, and Society, University of Pennsylvania, 2012

Specializations:  Information work in organizations, Information communication technologies for development (ICT4D), Organizational IT implementation, Healthcare IT implementation

Committee:  Dr. Diane Bailey (Chair), Dr. James Howison, Dr. Andrew Dillon, Dr. Caroline Bartel (McCombs School of Business)


Rachel Simons

Rachel Simons

Rachel Simons is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the School of Information at The University of Texas. She received her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Georgia, both in Comparative Literature. Rachel's research centers on diversity and ethics issues in both the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and in ICT development. Currently, she is planning a research project that aims to better understand diversity in collaborative video game design work, including an analysis of diversity as represented by: minority and under-represented group participation, the roles that organizational structure may play in aiding or hindering diversity and diverse perspectives, and the effects of cooperative computer tool selection and use in representing and/or cultivating diversity and diverse perspectives. Previously, Rachel examined the impact of gender-based harassment on social media. She has also recently been involved with a project related to university-level ethics education for Information and Computation professionals and another project dealing with curricula development for teaching future Social Media Professionals. Rachel served as Coordinator for the iSchool Doctoral Student Association for its inaugural 2013-2014 school year. She is a coordinator for the iSchool chapter of ASIS&T and its related iSchool student group, Advocating Women in Technology (AWIT).

Degrees:  B.A. in Comparative Literature, 2006, University of Georgia; M.A. in Comparative Literature, 2012, University of Georgia

Specializations:  Ethics, Education, Diversity, ICT Use and Society, Social Media, Computer-supported Cooperative Work, Feminist STS, Information Work, Video Games

Committee:  Dr. Kenneth R. Fleischmann (Chair), Dr. James Howison, Dr. Loriene Roy, Dr. Clay Spinuzzi (Department of English)

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Caroline Stratton

Caroline Stratton

Caroline studies the relationships between information and communication technologies (ICT) and socioeconomic development.

Degrees:  B.S. in Nuclear Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Specializations:  ICTs for development, Latin America

Committee:  Diane Bailey (Chair), Ken Fleischmann, James Howison, Joe Straubhaar


Yalin  Sun

Yalin  Sun

Yalin is now in her third year in the doctoral program. Her research is mainly focused on online information seeking behavior, health information seeking, and social media addiction.

Degrees:  B.B.A. in Information Management and Systems, 2012, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China; M.S. in Information Studies, 2014, the University of Texas at Austin

Specializations:  Consumer health information seeking & social media

Committee:  Dr. Yan Zhang (Chair), Dr. Bo Xie, Dr. Randolph Bias


Eryn Whitworth

Eryn Whitworth

Eryn studies work with an eye to the design of technology. Eschewing a technology-centered analysis, she investigates technology-mediated social interaction. Eryn has enriched her academic training with internships at Microsoft Research and Intel Labs and participated in Consortium for the Science of Sociotechnical Systems and Values and Design summer gatherings. She would love to talk you to about robotics and the future of skilled manual labor!

Degrees:  B.A. Philosophy; M.S.I.S emphasis in human-computer-interaction

Specializations:  Human Computer Interaction, Workplace Studies, Embodied Communication, Conversation Analysis

Committee:  Diane Bailey (Chair), Jurgen Streeck, James Howison


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