Tanya Clement Wins Best Digital Humanities Visualization Award

Assistant Professor Tanya Clement is a foremost scholar in the digital humanities field. Her work involves rethinking how institutions curate humanities data and how contexts resulting from changing resources and technologies influence humanists' scholarship.

 

In the 2012 awards competition of ALLC: The European Association for Digital Humanities, Tanya won Best Digital Humanities Visualization for A Thousand Words: Advanced Visualization for the Humanities, along with the staff and her partners at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. The winning project's long-term goal is to create the world's most advanced platform for humanities visualization. By utilizing these new software tools, a new class of scholars from the humanities will be able to use high-resolution displays and advanced computing to create visualizations, interactive maps, and multimedia works at a scale and resolution never before possible.

Tanya also recently received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to host the Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities as part of the HiPSTAS (High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship) Institute in May 2013. The Institute will include faculty, advanced graduate students, librarians, archivists, computer scientists, and developers interested in new technologies to access and analyze spoken word recordings within the thousands of hours of important spoken text audio files, dating from the 19th century to the present day.

Tanya's general research interests include digital humanities as it impacts academic research libraries and digital collections, research tools and (re)sources in the context of future applications, humanities informatics, and humanities data curation. Her other areas of inquiry include modernist literature, scholarly editing, and digital literacies.